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a grubbygrrrl favorite

Final version finally. I like the bright pink against the green. It took a long time to sew the pink letters to their white background with pink thread with tiny stitches. I used 3 strands of my 6 strand embroidery thread to sew the white letter background onto the green and white cat. Going through 3 layers of the iron-on adhesive plus the sweatshirt with the embroidery needle was tough on my fingertips, but somehow I made it. ;)

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Off to collapse into bed! Life is mostly cats and work, cats and work lately. Mostly I’m grateful to the 365 cat project for keeping me feeling balanced.

The challenge I took on for today from Noah Scalin’s book was to make something as tall as possible that would stand on it’s own. This project was also inspired by watching this TED Talk with cut paper artist Béatrice Coron.
This project actually took 3 days to complete. The first two days were drawing the pattern and cutting. The last day was spent gluing one layer to the next and letting it dry. Then gluing and waiting again. I had so much fun doing this. The finished building is about thigh high.
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And one of Béatrice Coron’s pieces:

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Silkscreening fun tonight!

So, things I learned from my silkscreening adventures:

1) start with a t-shirt I really like and want to wear even if there isn’t a design on it – I really just won’t wear a crappy t-shirt from the art supply store even if it only cost $3.99 US – putting a cat on the front doesn’t make me like it any more than I originally did

2) test run on a piece of fabric or old t-shirt is essential to find little imperfections in the glue that need to be taped

3) don’t get ink on the tape… that transfers to the t-shirt

4) I am not a one-swipe inker – it comes out too light for me, have to swipe at least twice

5) when I ink two shirts right in a row, need to swipe ink over the open screen to keep it from drying and blocking the flow of ink…

6) which then makes it impossible to see exactly where I’m placing the design on the second t-shirt because I’m looking at just a big smudge of ink on my side of the screen – gotta flip it over and mark some kind of points of reference with my fingers and flip it back and then set it down

Overall, I’m still fascinated by this silkscreening thing. Weird how different things capture different people’s interest. Thank goodness, eh? Or else we’d all be wearing only cat t-shirts!

Today’s cat was brewing in my mind – a projection of some kind – for a week or so. But after I saw this TED Talk with French street artist JR, it took a whole new dimension: LARGE! And on the side of our house!

One of Noah Scalin’s suggestions was to make something larger than life-size and this certainly qualifies. I may repeat that suggestion in a totally different way in the future if I have time for it.

I have to say I was both anxious at having the front of our house brightly lit up with a cat photo (as cars drove by) and excited.  Large things have power!

I was thinking of making today’s project make a statement by putting up a photo of a “homeless” cat but I didn’t have any photos of one.  And 10 years ago I found Chaos on the side of the road, a kitten soaked with flea product, a thick layer of flea dirt on him, crying and shivering. Nearby there was a cardboard box someone had probably dropped him off in. I suspect someone local knew I walked my dog every morning and put him there for me to find, but I’ll never know. He was the cutest, insane kitten. So he got the name Chaos, and the rest is history. So maybe if I did a whole project of projected cats, they would all be rescued cats with a story.

Here’s one of JR’s many pieces, which served as my inspiration. His TED Talk is interesting if you want to check it out, the link is above.